Appeals

An appeal typically begins when legal proceedings in a trial court end, for example by a jury verdict or summary-judgment order. If a party isn’t satisfied with the trial court’s decision, the party can appeal the decision to a higher court. The appellate court’s job is not to retry the case. It doesn’t hear testimony or decide the facts. Instead, it will consider whether the trial court properly applied the law, and has sufficient evidence to justify its ruling. If the trial court got the law right, the appellate court will uphold the decision; if the lower court was wrong, the appellate court will reverse the decision and send it back to the trial court often for further proceedings.

Because appeals are done almost entirely through written submissions, our appellate attorneys have developed a unique, easy-to-understand writing style that has been praised by judges, clients, and other attorneys. We carefully format our briefs and submissions to reflect the same attention to detail and thoroughness we apply to researching and writing substantive legal arguments. And—when it’s appropriate—we add pictures, insert boxes, graphs, and even hyperlinks to help judges understand our arguments.

Judges read thousands of submissions a year. Almost all of them look alike and read alike. Our briefs—with their sharp layout, clear prose, detailed research, and well-organized arguments—stand out. See for yourself here.